To Aleppo With Love – Sujuq

November 30th, 2017

Sujuq is a type of dry, spiced sausage that is somewhat similar to salami, with its three main characteristics being that it is salty, dry and has a high fat content. It consists of ground meat combined with various spices before being piped into a sausage casing. Sheep intestine has historically been the casing of choice, though nowadays both natural and artificial sausage casings are used. Sujuq is dried for at least three weeks before it is considered ready to consume. Also traditionally Sujuq is stuffed into clean, porous stockings and hanged for 3 to 5 days in a cool, dry place away from any sunlight.

I made sujuq without following the traditional methods and without drying because the weather in gulf is not suitable for air-dry, although I did not follow the traditional method but it has the same flavor of sujuq that I used to eat in Aleppo. In the post, I will show you different methods of using Sujuq.

Let’s make Sujuq:

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Hummus Bet-Tehineh

October 21st, 2017


Hummus is a Middle Eastern food that has become popular in other areas of the world. Hummus is made of chickpeas as the primary ingredient — after all, the word “hummus” means chickpeas in Arabic.

In Syria, Hummus has different varieties:

Hummus Bet-Tehineh: chickpeas blended with tahini, lemon juice, garlic and salt.

Hummus Bet-Tehineh W Lahmeh: same above but topped with meat and pine nuts.

Hummus Bi-Zeit Az-Zeitoun: a specialty of Hama, chickpeas blended with olive oil only. I’ll post it soon.

Let’s make Hummus Bet-Tehineh:

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Makdous Al-Bathenjan

September 29th, 2017

This post is related to : Typical Syrian Breakfast

It is the season of vegetables that are main ingredients of many Syrian dishes, one example is Eggplant (Bathenjan in Arabic). It is the time to make Makdous Al-Bathenjan, Mrabba Al-Bathenjan, Mrabba Al-Bathenjan Al-Halabi, and Mkhallal Al-Bathenjan (eggplant pickle).

Makdous Al-Bathenjan is a traditional Syrian dish that goes back generations. It is prepared by stuffing baby eggplants with a mixture of chopped walnuts, ground red pepper, salt and garlic and preserved in olive oil. It is normally eaten with Arabic flat bread as part of the breakfast or supper, or as a snack. Makdous is best made at home.

Let’s make Makdous Al-Bathenjan:

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Eid Al-Adha, Sweets – 2017

September 7th, 2017

Eid Al-Adha “Festival of Sacrifice” or “Greater Eid”, Eid Al-Adha annually falls on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja of the lunar Islamic calendar. It is celebrated all around the world, where people families visit, kids are given money, and Eid sweets are served to well-wishers and relatives. And like each year this post is about the sweets I prepared for Eid.

Read the Archive:

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2009

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2010

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2013

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2014

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2015

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2016

Eid Al-Adha, Sweets – 2009

Eid Al-Adha, Sweets – 2010

Eid Al-Adha, Sweets – 2015

Eid Al-Adha, Sweets – 2016

Eid Al-Fitr, Sweets – 2017

More pictures with details:

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Eid Al-Adha – 2017

September 1st, 2017

Eid Al-Adha “Festival of Sacrifice” or “Greater Eid”, Eid Al-Adha annually falls on the 10th day of the month of Dhul Hijja of the lunar Islamic calendar. The festivities last for three days or more depending on the country. Eid Al-Adha occurs the day after the pilgrims conducting Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia by Muslims worldwide, descend from Mount Arafat.

Eid Mubarak to all of you and your families. May you have a joyful and blessed Eid with family and friends.


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